Click here to bookmark Clausehound and search for clause/contract language

Choose from our expert-compiled document frameworks and customize from a vast library of clauses.

Can I Exclude a Loss of Profits in My Limitation of Liability Clause?

Landing a huge contract is exciting – and risky! The stakes are high when a large proportion of your business’ resources are dedicated to an important project – especially if the contract is terminated prematurely by the customer.

As drafters of commercial agreements, we understand how important it is to our clients to limit or exclude their liability as much as possible, whether they are the customer or the service provider. At the same time, we know you need to be paid for your services.

 

 

A recent case, Atos IT Solutions and Services v Sapient Canada Inc, highlighted a number of issues that can arise in a claim for breach of an IT services contract. The defendant, Sapient, subcontracted work to the plaintiff, Siemens, in connection with a $49.5M project to build a single software platform; convert existing data to the platform; and provide support for the new platform for up to three years. The defendant terminated the contract early, and the plaintiff sued for damages, including lost profits.

One of the issues was whether the plaintiff could sue for loss of profits (a whopping $3,575,990) even though ‘loss of profits’ was excluded in the limitation of liability clause. The clause provided that the parties “will be liable to the other with respect to this agreement and any other obligations related thereto only for direct damages…” Neither party was to be liable for “any indirect, special,consequential, punitive or for loss of profits (collectively “Excluded Damages”), even if the other party has been advised of the possibility of such damages…”

 

Source

 

The court held that the excluded damages applied only to indirect loss of profits, for example opportunities lost because of the acceptance of the contract, but did not apply to the direct loss of profits resulting from early termination of the project.

In relation to damages, a key principle of contract law is to place the plaintiff in the same position they would have been in had the contract been performed (i.e. make the plaintiff “whole”). In this case, the contract for up to three years of support services was priced on a fixed fee basis, and was a reliable indication of the amount of loss of direct profits.

Lessons learned from Atos:

1. The significance of  drafting a tight limitation of liability clause that takes into account the reasonable expectations of the parties and common law interpretations of similar clauses cannot be understated. While no claim for indirect loss of profits was made in this case, the court implied that the language of the limitation clause, which is similar to many clauses found in various commercial contracts, can exclude indirect profits.

2. If you want the protection of being able to claim for a loss of direct profits, it is important to specifically include that right in your contract without inadvertently limiting it in the limitation provisions.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

What if I Can’t Deliver on my Contract?

When you sign a contract, one of the most worrisome questions is “What if I simply can’t deliver? What happens if I physically cannot perform my contractual obligations through no fault of my own?”

Although they apply in only the most strictly interpreted, limited situations, the doctrine of frustration and force majeure clauses can come to the rescue. The first relies primarily on the courts, while the second relies on careful contract drafting.

But what exactly are the doctrine of frustration and force majeure clauses?

1. The Doctrine of Frustration

As a general rule, contracts require “perfect performance”. In other words, performance must conform fully to the obligations as they are stated in the contract. But what about situations that you either did not or could not anticipate? Under such circumstances, the doctrine of frustration might apply. This doctrine states that an (i) unforeseen, supervening event that (ii) renders performance of the contract impossible will set the contract aside, so long as (iii) neither party is responsible for the event.

Let’s break this down:

  • The event must be unforeseen and supervening. This means that the event must occur after the agreement has been entered into and must not have been known or knowable.
  • The event must render performance impossible. This requires actual impossibility – expense, inconvenience, etc. are insufficient.
  • Neither party may be responsible for the event. This includes indirect responsibility.

For this doctrine to apply, the frustrating event must defeat the purpose of the contract. To determine whether the purpose has been frustrated, the purpose must first be identified. As such, it is important to include a statement outlining the purpose of the agreement, or else risk the court coming to its own conclusion. This is often found in the background or recitals of an agreement.

What’s the result?

Under Ontario’s Frustrated Contracts Act, if you can establish frustration, you’re (a) entitled to recover any payments made and (b) cleared from any existing debt under the contract. This is applicable to most commercial contexts.

It is important to remember that the common law holds that this doctrine will not be easily invoked and will require truly exceptional circumstances in order to apply. As well, this will only help if you are already in court and the court agrees with you that the contract has been frustrated. It is important to add the protection of a force majeure clause to your contract.



2. Force Majeure Clause

A Force Majeure Clause, may be easier to invoke than the doctrine of frustration. For a force majeure clause to be applicable, the party must typically show that:

  • the event is within the scope of the clause, and the event occurred;
  • the event was outside the control of the party;
  • the event prevented or delayed the party’s performance of its contractual obligations;
  • the party did its best to mitigate (i.e. minimize) the effects of the event; and
  • the affected party gave timely notice according to the terms of the contract.


It is important to include a force majeure clause in any agreement, as it can demonstrate concrete evidence of an intention for a party to be relieved of its contractual obligations under a listed set of circumstances. A legal document service, such as Clausehound, can provide you with examples of  force majeure clauses. It is important to include the types of events that will most likely affect your contract, and to understand how these clauses work.

This article describes how a force majeure clause functions and provides some further elaboration on the types of events often listed in such a clause. The effect of invoking a force majeure clause can be described in the clause itself.

 

3. Conclusion

“What if I simply can’t deliver? What happens if I physically cannot perform my contractual obligations?” The answer may depend on why you can’t perform your obligations.

If the purpose of the contract has been frustrated, a judge may side with you and find that you can’t deliver. Alternatively, a force majeure clause can help if a superseding, catastrophic event occurs that prevents you from fulfilling your contractual promises.


Key Takeaways: Try to come to an agreed upon contract “purpose” and negotiate the inclusion of a force majeure clause. It’s critical that you consider the promises you’re making and all potential events that could occur. In most situations, the law will hold you to your promises because, as they say, “your word is your bond!”

 

This blog was co-written by Samita Pachai.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

As a Programmer, Are You Committing Intellectual Property Theft by Abstracting Ideas Learned at Work Into a SaaS Product?

In this day and age, technology is taking over every aspect of our lives. Ideas developed for one area can be modified with ease and adopted in another area. If you are starting your own business, you need to protect your intellectual property to avoid someone else using your hard work in a different market. But what if you come up with an idea while working on a different project?

 

 

What is intellectual property theft?

Intellectual property theft is the stealing of creative ideas. In the area of start-up businesses, intellectual property is a huge concern. After all, you are dealing with new ideas in its early stages with significant progress to be made. As a programmer, you come across new ideas all the time, which may inspire some ideas of your own. The challenge is making sure that you aren’t taking anything that is not yours. The line between committing intellectual property theft and the creation of new ideas is not always clear, but the agreements you have signed as a developer may give you some clues about where to draw the line.

Source

 

Master Service Agreement

Start with the Master Service Agreement. If you are performing work for someone, your specific tasks, duties, and obligations should be clearly outlined. A well drafted Master Service Agreement will define your intellectual property rights as of before the work begins with the developer, while the work is in progress, and after the work is completed. These definitions are extremely important and often hotly negotiated, as is the ownership of these types of intellectual property. You may wish to make sure that the definition of client confidential information is not so broad that it includes all ideas developed during the term of the agreement.

 

Click here to see Clausehound’s Master Service Agreement!

 

 

Employment Agreement

If you are an employee, the rights you have as a developer may be a bit more limited.

Most employment contracts will contain language which requires you to transfer all rights to intellectual property created during the course of your employment. Some agreements allow employees to develop ideas independently, if they are developed outside of work time and without the use of employer intellectual property or confidential information.

 

Click here to see Clausehound’s Employment Agreement!

 

Under the Copyrights Act, if the work is created in the course of employment under a contract of service, then the employer will be the owner of the copyright in the work created by the employee. What this means is that you cannot retain any rights to work created during the course of your employment if you do not have an agreement that allows you to retain that right. Copyright includes artistic work but may be much broader and can include work related to technology.

 

Under the Patent Act, courts have decided that the employee will retain ownership pursuant to two exceptions. First, if you are “hired to invent”, which means hired for the purpose of creating ideas for your employer, then you would not be able to claim those ideas as your own. Your employer retains those rights and any ideas that you have. The second exception allows the employer to obtain the rights if you transfer those rights to the employer in an agreement.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

Software Development Master Services Agreements Part IX: Acceptance of the Delivered Work in an MSA

Links from this article:
Small Business Law Library

ACCEPTANCE OF THE DELIVERED WORK

For the vendor in a Master Services Agreement (MSA), acceptance of their delivered work is usually a required customer step before payment. With specific types of contracts where they have frequent or periodic milestones, acceptance is a normal part of the work delivery, approval and payment process. These steps protect the customer from having a defective product at the end of the agreement. The more milestones, the more the customer gets to see the product before it is finished. It is helpful to design formal testing criteria for both the vendor and customer during negotiations of the MSA. This allows the vendor to know what to test for before sending it in for acceptance. This also saves time on behalf of the customer.

 

 

In particular, software development agreements have frequent checkpoints based on design or functionality specifications. The requirement for acceptance is an important “gatekeeper” to make sure that the product matches specifications and is bug-free. To put it simply, customers do not want to be billed unless the developed software is working properly.

 

Clausehound’s Small Business Law Library has a number of different Software Development Agreement templates, suitable for a variety of situations.

 

 

DRAFTING AN ACCEPTANCE PROVISION

For the vendor – a loose acceptance provision, where the customer can continue to demand further development, could result in a tiresome loop of testing and retesting.

Vendors can try to impose a “drop-dead date” or date of “deemed” acceptance where, after a certain number of days or a specific deadline, it will be considered accepted for that milestone. This is to ensure that periods of silence from a busy customer will not threaten the work delivery and payment period.
For the customer – they will try and keep the deemed acceptance period as long as possible and may also require that the vendor properly delivery notice for when testing has commenced. Adequate notice may be a broadly worded provision within the agreement or may be as specific as requiring that a specific person or persons are contacted and/or are available i.e. not on vacation or out of office during the acceptance period.

 

Stay tuned for more blogs on this topic!

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

Software Development Master Services Agreements Part VIII: Customer Responsibilities from the Vendor’s Point of View in an MSA

CUSTOMER RESPONSIBILITIES WANTED FROM THE VENDOR

We have all run into this problem at some point in our business lives: trying to get a project or task done but you have to wait on another person to provide you with the necessary documents to finish it up. Not just annoying, these delays can be costly in terms of underutilized staff or penalties for missed deadlines, if we’re talking about deadlines in a Master Services Agreement (MSA).

The vendor (consultant, developer, etc.) in an MSA will want the customer to agree on certain obligations and responsibilities during the course of the agreement. This is important since it ensures that a vendor will not fail to meet deadlines due to customers not replying or providing the necessary information.
Ultimately if the customer is materially breaching the contract the Vendor will have certain common law remedies, but for the “gray area” issues that may or may not be construed a material breach, it is better to stipulate the customer responsibilities up front.

 

Click here to view Software Development Master Services Agreements through Clausehound.com!

legal-tender-logo-220x82-2_Artboard 2

 

PROTECTING THE VENDOR

Customer responsibilities can also extend to protect the vendor from the actions of the customer. An example would be that the customer has to comply with all applicable laws and, failing to do so, the vendor can terminate the agreement. It also prevents the vendor from being stuck in an agreement that they have no ability to terminate if the customer continues to make unreasonable requests.
Below are several examples of common customer responsibilities (note that being timely is important):

    • The Customer should be responsible to provide information and direction for the vendor. This information should be accurate (as we all know, inaccuracies can cause delays!);
    • The Customer should appoint a person who is a contact liaison for the vendor and is responsible to promptly respond to vendor inquiries and requests;
    • The Customer should ensure that the vendor has access to any required equipment and Facilities in a timely manner;
    • The Customer should promptly review any delivered work product (this requirement is also usually found within the acceptance provisions of an agreement);
    • The Customer should commit to promptly paying vender invoices (this obligation usually appears in the payment terms provisions of the agreement, and a covenant to make prompt payment is a nice-to-have);
    • The Customer should be asked to commit to complying with applicable law – and, actually, both the customer and vendor should be acting in accordance with law, but from the perspective of either party, this clause is useful to provide a termination mechanism in the event that illegal activities are suggested; and
    • The Customer should commit to purchasing any third party supplied equipment, software licenses and so on that are required to perform the activity (language to this effect may also be included in the expenses provision or in the fees provisions, but it may be helpful to include that here as well).

The extent to which these clauses are implemented is dependent on either party’s bargaining power.

 

You can view Clausehound’s sample Software Development Agreement here:

SDA

 

 

To continue reading additional articles within this series, click here.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

 

Read more...

Software Development Master Services Agreements Part VII: The Term of an MSA

Links from this article:
“scope of work”
here

TERM OF A MASTER SERVICES AGREEMENT

The term of a consulting agreement that is a Master Services Agreement (MSA) may be for an extended period, because the scope of work may, in fact, be a series of scopes of work that are defined at different points in time over the course of several years. An MSA allows for the two parties to quickly renegotiate future transactions or agreements since they can rely on the terms of the existing master agreement.

RESUMING A MASTER SERVICES AGREEMENT

Once the much lengthier master agreement has been finalized, the consulting engagement may start and stop several times but the parties are able to negotiate the “scope of work”, which is usually in the form of a schedule that is attached to the agreement, fairly quickly. Since an MSA lasts quite a long time, conditions for revision or amendments to the MSA (as opposed to changes in scope) will, of course, be useful.

These amendment clauses usually require the approval of both parties in order to take effect. There may also be a provision for certain terms to change on a periodic basis. For example, an MSA contract might have a five-year term, but a provision that allows for the contractor’s hourly rate to be changed at a certain point in time each year to account for inflation.

To continue reading additional articles within this series, click here.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

Software Development/Master Services Agreements Part VI: Payment Terms

Links from this article:
Part II
Part IV
here

DEPOSIT/RETAINER
We had discussed the payment of a deposit or retainer prior to commencement of the services within Part II of this series. Once the engagement commences, invoicing made by the vendor in a Master Services Agreement (MSA) is particularly important as it can be a form of control by the customer. If the MSA includes milestones for which invoices are submitted, the customer may require that the contractor can only provide invoices for approved or accepted work products.

PAYMENT TIMING
The parties may agree to a payment based on dates or milestones. With respect to milestones, the customer may require that the contractor only provide invoices for approved or accepted work product. To make the invoicing process even more stringent, the may further require that invoices contain an approved purchase order number that has been obtained from the company in advance of invoicing.

PAYMENT DEADLINE
From the vendor’s perspective, specifying a payment deadline is important, and such a deadline may be either specified in advance in the contract (e.g. a monthly retainer that is due and payable within five days after the end of every month), or may be a deadline specific to each invoice (e.g. payment is due within a certain number of days after the invoice is delivered). A deadline is an important payment term for the vendor, without which it would be difficult to request a remedy for non-payment (such as: immediate request for payment failing which work will pause, intellectual property will cease to be assigned, the agreement may be terminated, and/or the dispute resolution mechanisms may be triggered.)

FORM OF PAYMENT
The form of payment can be in whatever form in agreed by the parties – including cheque, wire transfer, even in cash in some circumstances. As also noted in Part IV of this Series, if payment is received in cash, keep in mind that it is difficult to deposit more than a certain dollar amount without receiving a red flag from the banking authorities who are tracking the flow of funds to comply with anti-money laundering, and anti-terrorist legislation.

INTEREST RATE
Specifying an interest rate is a typical payment term. Often times the vendor will specify a rate that applies after 30 days of non-payment without the intention of charging the interest to a good client – as an interest charge on a long-time client can sour the relationship. However, it is important to include an interest rate for (at least) two reasons:

(1) the rate provides an incentive or lever for payment to be made, especially if it is a rate that is greater than the prevailing bank interest rate (and without which the cost to the customer of making payment is possibly greater than the value to be generated by delaying payment);

and

(2) in the event that the customer fails to pay to such an extent that the vendor is required to bring legal action to enforce payment, the claimant (vendor) will want to include interest accrued as part of the claim.

Keep in mind when specifying interest that the criminal code in certain jurisdictions will preclude “usury” or charging of an unfair interest rate. Consult with the criminal code or similar legislation to ensure that the usury rules are not being breached.

CURRENCY
When establishing payment terms, the form of currency related to payments and expenses in a Master Services Agreement (MSA) should be stipulated. This may seem fairly trivial for business that are operating and selling services in the same jurisdiction but, if the currency rates fluctuate, with enough customers in that local jurisdiction, an opportunity could present itself for the customers to open a local office or bank account in that local currency. This could skew the payment that the vendor was expecting. For businesses that operate in multiple jurisdictions, it is even more important to specify which currency that compensation will be paid in as it could leave the vendor with a large amount of money in an unwanted currency. It is important to keep in mind that if a significant amount of business is conducted in a particular jurisdiction, that there are rules for registering a business in that jurisdiction.

To continue reading additional articles within this series, click here.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

Software Development/Master Services Agreements Part V: Compensation Levers

Links from this article:
here

SUCCESS FEES AND DISCOUNTS
Fees discounts and/or success fees may be applied and this can either be formalized or discretionary. For example a discount may be applied in the event that the transaction or engagement does not proceed beyond a certain point. Alternatively, a success fee may be applied in the event that the engagement is completed on schedule. Other mechanisms for discount/premium could include a variance (for example a plus or minus of 5% of fees charged) that is based on customer satisfaction.

RATE CARD
As noted previously, fees quoted on a time and materials will require a rate card i.e. an hourly rate for each individual working on the client engagement. It is fairly common to provide a rate schedule for members of the contractor’s team who are working in different roles on the team, or with different levels of experience. The customer may negotiate that certain (for example low-level) work will only be performed by team members with a specific role or at a certain pay level. Furthermore the vendor may wish negotiate a blended rate for their entire team that takes into account a mix of junior and senior level contractors, which makes the task of recording and calculating time administratively easier. Language is often included that allows for an increase in the rates on the rate card periodically (e.g. once per year), which is intended to account for inflationary pressures on the cost of living.

FEES FOR ONBOARDING REPLACEMENT STAFF
Fees for the onboarding of staff on the project, specifically replacement staff, may be a point of negotiation. Naturally, a fixed fee scope would address this from the customers perspective, but on a time and materials/fee estimate or fee capped engagement, the customer may not want to pay for the onboarding time for key personnel replacements, and may request a reduced rate for staff during their training or onboarding period.

The vendor may address this by building a solid transition process to keep the downtime or overlapping staffing on a project, or learning time, to a minimum.

RESEARCH TAX CREDITS
Government tax incentive programs may allow for reduced expenses related to technology-related staff and expenses, where innovation is occuring. The vendor and the customer can negotiate to decide who will be benefitting from those tax credits. A vendor that is able to capture the credits may be able to grow it’s team more quickly as a result of tax incentives. No matter who ultimately decides to claim this benefit, it can be used as a bargaining chip for potentially reduced rates.

To continue reading additional articles within this series, click here.

 

–  –  –

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.

What you don't know can hurt you! Subscribe to stay informed.

Sign up now and receive an email when we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Read more...

Additional Rent Announcements API Approval of Terms Asset Purchase Agreement Background Intellectual Property Board of Directors Business Case Law CASL Clausehound Collaboration Commercial Lease Confidential Information Confidentiality Consulting Agreement Contract Drafting Contract Negotiations Corporation Costs and Expenses CPD Definition of Intellectual Property Dispute Resolution Distribution Agreement Employee Employment Employment Agreement ESOP Events Farming Law Generally Used Clauses Grant of Licence Handling of Confidential Information Indemnity Independent Contractor Independent Legal Advice Informal Discussions Intellectual Property Intellectual Property Transfer Investor Journey Licence Restrictions Limitation of Liability Long Form Marriage Contract Master Services Agreement NDA Non-competition Not for Profit Articles of Incorporation Notice of Arbitration No Waiver Obligations Ownership of Intellectual Property Ownership of Work Product Parties Partnership Privacy Policy Product Sales Agreement Purpose Representations and Warranties Restrictive Covenants Safeguarding Requirements Settlement Agreement Shareholder Agreement Software Development Start-up Subscription Agreement Technology Termination Term Sheet Terms of Use Trademark Registration Transfer of Intellectual Property Waivers and Releases Website Terms of Use
Show All Tags